Your Memory's Museum
Your Memory's Museum

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NYTIMES: After Death, the Remix
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NYTIMES: Bans On Fireworks Lifted to Bring New Tax Revenue
FIREMAN

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NY TIMES - Food on His Mind, and in His Stomach as Well (Action Bronson @ Gramercy Theatre)

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ASAP Rocky x NY Times Interview
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The Lives They Lived: Adam Yauch (via @NYTmag)
“There’s three of us but we’re not the Beatles,” Joseph (Run) Simmons declared — defiantly, if confusingly — on Run-DMC’s 1985 single “King of Rock.” There were also three Beastie Boys, and they weren’t the Beatles, either. But no rap group charted a more Beatles­esque career arc. They started out as lovable goofballs who still seemed to present a threat to parental authority; they went on to inspire a generation just by growing up in public. And of the three Beasties, it was Adam Yauch — also known as MCA — who grew up the most.

The Lives They Lived: Adam Yauch (via @NYTmag)

“There’s three of us but we’re not the Beatles,” Joseph (Run) Simmons declared — defiantly, if confusingly — on Run-DMC’s 1985 single “King of Rock.” There were also three Beastie Boys, and they weren’t the Beatles, either. But no rap group charted a more Beatles­esque career arc. They started out as lovable goofballs who still seemed to present a threat to parental authority; they went on to inspire a generation just by growing up in public. And of the three Beasties, it was Adam Yauch — also known as MCA — who grew up the most.

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The Lives They Lived: Stay High 149 (via @NYTmag)
It’s hard to resist the Rip Van Winkle comparison. When Wayne Roberts showed up at a graffiti-art show in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, in 2000, after being AWOL for 20-odd years thanks to a heroin habit, he re-emerged to a city that was radically different from the one he dropped out of. According to his biographer, Chris Pape, Roberts brought a new sort of bravado and style to the graffiti world in the early ’70s with his tag, STAY HIGH 149, and Smoker figure — a copy of the logo from the British TV show “The Saint,” adorned with a joint at its lips.

The Lives They Lived: Stay High 149 (via @NYTmag)

It’s hard to resist the Rip Van Winkle comparison. When Wayne Roberts showed up at a graffiti-art show in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, in 2000, after being AWOL for 20-odd years thanks to a heroin habit, he re-emerged to a city that was radically different from the one he dropped out of. According to his biographer, Chris Pape, Roberts brought a new sort of bravado and style to the graffiti world in the early ’70s with his tag, STAY HIGH 149, and Smoker figure — a copy of the logo from the British TV show “The Saint,” adorned with a joint at its lips.