Your Memory's Museum
Your Memory's Museum

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NYTIMES: After Death, the Remix
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NYTIMES: Bans On Fireworks Lifted to Bring New Tax Revenue
FIREMAN

6

NY TIMES - Food on His Mind, and in His Stomach as Well (Action Bronson @ Gramercy Theatre)

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ASAP Rocky x NY Times Interview
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The Lives They Lived: Adam Yauch (via @NYTmag)
“There’s three of us but we’re not the Beatles,” Joseph (Run) Simmons declared — defiantly, if confusingly — on Run-DMC’s 1985 single “King of Rock.” There were also three Beastie Boys, and they weren’t the Beatles, either. But no rap group charted a more Beatles­esque career arc. They started out as lovable goofballs who still seemed to present a threat to parental authority; they went on to inspire a generation just by growing up in public. And of the three Beasties, it was Adam Yauch — also known as MCA — who grew up the most.

The Lives They Lived: Adam Yauch (via @NYTmag)

“There’s three of us but we’re not the Beatles,” Joseph (Run) Simmons declared — defiantly, if confusingly — on Run-DMC’s 1985 single “King of Rock.” There were also three Beastie Boys, and they weren’t the Beatles, either. But no rap group charted a more Beatles­esque career arc. They started out as lovable goofballs who still seemed to present a threat to parental authority; they went on to inspire a generation just by growing up in public. And of the three Beasties, it was Adam Yauch — also known as MCA — who grew up the most.

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The Lives They Lived: Stay High 149 (via @NYTmag)
It’s hard to resist the Rip Van Winkle comparison. When Wayne Roberts showed up at a graffiti-art show in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, in 2000, after being AWOL for 20-odd years thanks to a heroin habit, he re-emerged to a city that was radically different from the one he dropped out of. According to his biographer, Chris Pape, Roberts brought a new sort of bravado and style to the graffiti world in the early ’70s with his tag, STAY HIGH 149, and Smoker figure — a copy of the logo from the British TV show “The Saint,” adorned with a joint at its lips.

The Lives They Lived: Stay High 149 (via @NYTmag)

It’s hard to resist the Rip Van Winkle comparison. When Wayne Roberts showed up at a graffiti-art show in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, in 2000, after being AWOL for 20-odd years thanks to a heroin habit, he re-emerged to a city that was radically different from the one he dropped out of. According to his biographer, Chris Pape, Roberts brought a new sort of bravado and style to the graffiti world in the early ’70s with his tag, STAY HIGH 149, and Smoker figure — a copy of the logo from the British TV show “The Saint,” adorned with a joint at its lips.

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No Words Says It All
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FUN FACTS that didn’t fit in the Yams story:

-Rocky says the song above influenced the “Long.Live.ASAP” title track.

-Yams wanted to get Playa Fly to appear on “Live.Love.ASAP.”

-An early suggestion by the label was to have ‘1 Train” be with Nas and Raekwon, to appease traditionalists.

-“Fuckin’ Problems” came from Drake’s camp more or less complete.

-Rocky styled Yams for the “Goldie” video, and Yams was wearing Rocky’s pants, which didn’t fit, and had to be covered by a long t-shirt: “I looked like a fucking Peruvian drug dealer!”

-Yams’s pre-RNT blog: choppasondeck.wordpress.com.

-Bari had a beard at 14.

-On RNT: “I’ma bite Up North Trips, I’ma take the Dirty Glove content and I’ma mix it with Noz’s whole writing style.”

-He met Branson and left with free champagne.

-I didn’t even know about this record with Turf Talk.

(via bodying)

36
Older Players the Knicks Could Have Added by the Trade Deadline
As the N.B.A. trading deadline approached Thursday afternoon, the Knicks sent 27-year-old guard Ronnie Brewer to the Thunder for a draft pick. That left the Knicks with a roster spot to fill, and a few hours later they said they were going to sign 35-year-old forward Kenyon Martin, who has yet to play an N.B.A. game this season. By replacing Brewer with Martin, the Knicks, who started the season as the oldest team in N.B.A. history, got even older. Surely a team that in the off-season signed Rasheed Wallace, a 38-year-old who had been out of the N.B.A. for two years, has more vision than that. Here are some suggestions.

Older Players the Knicks Could Have Added by the Trade Deadline

As the N.B.A. trading deadline approached Thursday afternoon, the Knicks sent 27-year-old guard Ronnie Brewer to the Thunder for a draft pick. That left the Knicks with a roster spot to fill, and a few hours later they said they were going to sign 35-year-old forward Kenyon Martin, who has yet to play an N.B.A. game this season. By replacing Brewer with Martin, the Knicks, who started the season as the oldest team in N.B.A. history, got even older. Surely a team that in the off-season signed Rasheed Wallace, a 38-year-old who had been out of the N.B.A. for two years, has more vision than that. Here are some suggestions.

50
Laughing at Rappers, Who Laugh Right Back (via @nytimesarts)
It’s almost certainly too soon, and definitely futile, to be discussing what constitutes golden ages of any Internet pursuit, but in the area of hip-hop humor the peaks may have already been set.
From 2007 to ’09 the brother duo ItsTheReal — Eric and Jeff Rosenthal — made a steady stream of parody videos that came to include some of the biggest names in the genre, all of whom were happily in on the joke. In 2010 and ’11 the Kid Mero was posting at high velocity on his blog, Victory Light, an all-caps take-no-prisoners fusillade of insult and raunch that mercilessly dissected hip-hop, among other things.   [Read More…]

Laughing at Rappers, Who Laugh Right Back (via @nytimesarts)

It’s almost certainly too soon, and definitely futile, to be discussing what constitutes golden ages of any Internet pursuit, but in the area of hip-hop humor the peaks may have already been set.

From 2007 to ’09 the brother duo ItsTheReal — Eric and Jeff Rosenthal — made a steady stream of parody videos that came to include some of the biggest names in the genre, all of whom were happily in on the joke. In 2010 and ’11 the Kid Mero was posting at high velocity on his blog, Victory Light, an all-caps take-no-prisoners fusillade of insult and raunch that mercilessly dissected hip-hop, among other things.   [Read More…]